Sunday, May 3, 2020

Nike Factory Life Savers or Back Breakers

Life Savers or Back Breakers


Unless your bike is equipped with saddlebags, there’s a good chance you’re d Nike Factory owning a backpack while getting your goods from A to B. and with that said, the invariable question arises: would a backpack be good or bad for you in the event of an unplanned pavement scraping excursion?

The query has been looming in my transom for some time now, so when reader Peter emailed the same question (which has also been posed on another forum), I thought I’d throw it out to you, my readers, and ask whether or not you’ve had any direct experience (or theories) on what happens to backpacks in the event of a crash: would having an object strapped to your back offer abrasion resistance, or could it transfer load forces from impact and cause further damage to your spine?

I also posted the question , where answers are coming in (one of which is a recounting of a firsthand experience which might make you swear off wearing anything whatsoever on your back while you ride.) Comment there or click below with your thoughts on the safety of wearing a backpack on a bike.

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3 Enough padding between the lap top and my back so it fairly comfortable.

All 3 accomplished and never had an issue, nor have I ever thought further about it until now. Unless designed to do so, I wouldn't think of it as protection. I do think it could disperse energy in the right circumstances though.

May 14, 2013 at 3:07 pm

(3) Dave M says:I against it. Number one it raises your center of gravity which you are taught in MSF courses that you need to keep the weight low and use the Triangle method, (from your head top point to the axles on the front and rear wheels.) You would have to get used to the additional weight which a rider would change based on what he/she wanted to haul in the backpack and something else to get tangled up in if you fall, especially if it is not securely hooked together with the shoulder straps. When people go down on a bike they never slide just on their backs either, they tumble. As a former Missouri State Trooper and having worked numerous motorcycle accidents, tank bags or tail bags are a much better way to go.

May 14, 2013 at 4:28 pm

(4) Richard says:I went down last year on a bike. Had someone come out of turn only in front of me. Laid down the bike and slid into the car. Had on a backpack that did take some damage and I believe helped protect me from other injuries. Now I ride with a full rooster vest.

May 15, 2013 at 11:01 am

(5) Peter says:Good subject. Keep those responses coming.

May 15, 2013 at 12:26 pm
https://in.nike-shoes-canada.ca/2020/04/nike-factory-life-sentence-for-bashing.html
(6) Chuck says:I disagree with dave M. reasoning about center of gravity. IMHO, tail bags, large tank bags, and to Nike Factory a lesser extent saddlebags raise the bike CG (to the point I would not attach anything to the bike much higher than the seat. These upset the balance of the bike. This is most noticeable when the bike is stopped, whether mounting or dismounting, and less so when riding. Metal or heavy plastic saddlebags Nike Factory , like Jesse Bags or Caribous, do offer a considerable degree of protection, especially when coupled with decent crash bars.

I don think back packs have anything to do with a bike handling when underway, and I welcome the protection they offer my back and spine. Unless you are carrying something hard, like a hardshell briefcase, which might in fact transmit impacts to the spine, the normal contents of a backpack like rain gear, insulation, etc, offer considerable protection.

May 15, 2013 at 4:44 pm

(7) Rob Hall says:I crashed and was Nike Factory thrown over a car and landed on my back. I was wearing a backpack holding nothing but a Nikon camera.

The Nikon survived, and so did I. But I would not regard this as any kind of proof of safe practice. I just got lucky.
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